Tipton-Haynes Historic Site

Posted by on Mar 12, 2012 in Blog | 7 comments

Advertised as “Tennessee’s most historic site”, the Tipton-Haynes Historic Site is located just outside Johnson City in north east Tennessee.  The site relays the story of Tennessee’s history from early settlement days through Reconstruction after the Civil War era.  An ancient buffalo trail ran near the site of the “bold spring,” and the grounds were frequented successively by the Woodland Indians, the Cherokees, and European explorers and traders.  The buffalo trail later became the Jonesborough, Tennessee to Morganton, North Carolina Stage Road.

Tipton-Haynes Historic Site, Johnson City, Tennessee

Tipton-Haynes Historic Site, Johnson City, Tennessee

–  Click on the image to enlarge or purchase  –

Colonel John Tipton built a 25 by 35 foot log cabin on the site .  During his 30+ years of occupancy, Colonel Tipton enlarged the home.  His son, John Tipton Jr., inherited the home in 1813 and continued its development.  David Haynes purchased the Tipton farm and in 1839 gave the estate to his son, Landon Carter Haynes as a wedding present when he married Eleanor Powell.

Landon Carter Haynes enlarged and renovated the main house and developed the site much as it appears today.  A kitchen, dining room and back porch were added to the original building.  The stone chimney is original and the rest of the original cabin still exists and is contained within the large white house.

Tipton-Haynes Historic Site, Johnson City, Tennessee

Tipton-Haynes Historic Site, Johnson City, Tennessee

–  Click on the image to enlarge or purchase  –

The double crib barn is built from hand-hewn logs with V notching.  Food for the animals was stored overhead and farm equipment kept in the breezeway, as seen today.  Colonel John Tipton housed his Virginia-bred race horses in this barn.  Horse racing was a favorite sport of the early settlers.

Tipton-Haynes Historic Site, Johnson City, Tennessee

Tipton-Haynes Historic Site, Johnson City, Tennessee

–  Click on the image to enlarge or purchase  –

There are eleven buildings on the site providing a wide array of photo opportunities.  These include the original buildings as well as reconstructions and those relocated to the site as representations of the originals.

7 Comments

  1. Great history lesson Mark. The images are quite well done showing the textures and age of the place. Well done.
    Len Saltiel recently posted..Spring is ComingMy Profile

  2. Nice series Mark. Nice amount of detail in the images too.
    Marc Collins recently posted..St Marks dawnMy Profile

  3. I really do love this set! Great details in both the images and the accompanying details you shared. Awesome stuff, my friend!
    Toad Hollow Photography recently posted..Macaulay Point: The First Bastion: Pt 1My Profile

  4. Really interesting history Mark and the images are well done. Wonderful details.
    Edith Levy recently posted..Forget Mugshots – 10 Steps To Better PortraitsMy Profile

  5. Great post, Mark. Love the history-filled write-ups.

    Your photography here is outstanding. Really love that wagon in the barn shot. Excellent work, sir. 😉
    Jimi Jones recently posted..Harrys Oyster Bar and SeafoodMy Profile

  6. great treatment Mark and love the historical background too!
    Jim Nix recently posted..Blue hour in Old MontrealMy Profile

  7. Great information Mark. Some of it I haven’t been able to find elsewhere. I’m very interested in finding out what Tipton’s house/cabin looked like (additions from the original size, number of rooms, etc) at the time of the Battle of Franklin, in 1788. I’m working on a novel that includes this battle, and am not at present able to travel to TN to see the place. Hope to before too long.
    Lori Benton recently posted..Don’t Panic in the MiddleMy Profile

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